The Control indicates that my water temperature is too low/high - what does that mean?

If you get water temperature alerts or notifications when you run water, there may be an issue with your heating or cooling systems, or they could be off in hot or cold temperatures. For example, if your water temperature is too low, it could mean that you do not currently have the heating on in the home and the cold weather outside is directly impacting your pipes. In this scenario, you should also receive an ambient temperature (potential pipe freeze) warning. When water or pipes freeze, you will be at risk of a burst pipe and water not reaching the home.

If you receive a water is too hot warning, it could mean that your cooling system is not on (however, water too hot warning is fairly uncommon as it is rare for water to reach above 80 degrees Fahrenheit on your normal line (AWWA standards state that cold water goes up to 80 degrees Fahrenheit).  Hot water could negatively impact the usage of some appliances. However, a lot of appliances have built-in anti-scalding devices to help prevent this. 

 There is a slight possibility that the water coming from the street is coming too hot or too cold but these are rare situations. 

See below for the types of water temperature alerts you may receive and what they mean:

 

There are two temperature sensors in the Control. One sensor measures air temperature and the other measures water temperature. See below for the types of temperature alerts you may receive and what they mean.

  • "Freeze alert detected at 'location' at [time]." This alert is triggered when the air around the pipe at the Control's location is nearing freezing temperatures (32 degrees Fahrenheit or 0 degrees Celsius). 
  • "Water temperature TOO LOW at 'location' at [time]." This means the Control measured the temperature of the water in the pipe to be less than 40 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • "Water temperature TOO HIGH at 'location' at [time]." The Control has measured the temperature of the water in the pipe to be greater than 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

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